The Latest

MY NEW ARTICLE FOR EUPHORIA:

Art House: In the name of expression. Here’s a glimpse of 5 art house films which have stimulated our conscious and subconscious sensations. http://www.euphoriaonline.co.uk/art-house-cinema-in-the-name-of-expression/
Jul 8, 2014

MY NEW ARTICLE FOR EUPHORIA:

Art House: In the name of expression. Here’s a glimpse of 5 art house films which have stimulated our conscious and subconscious sensations. http://www.euphoriaonline.co.uk/art-house-cinema-in-the-name-of-expression/

my first article for Euphoria mag٠٠ 
   A World of Cinematic Senses٠٠
www.euphoriaonline.co.uk
Jul 8, 2014 / 1 note

my first article for Euphoria mag٠٠ A World of Cinematic Senses٠٠ www.euphoriaonline.co.uk

Rita ٠٠
Mar 5, 2014 / 10 notes

Rita ٠٠

(via mermaid-of-the-seven-seas)

"my old pains resurface"

٠Silences of the Palace٠٠1994
Feb 13, 2014 / 41 notes

"my old pains resurface"

٠Silences of the Palace٠٠1994

film speaks in a unique language of Sight & Sound ٠٠٠
Feb 2, 2014 / 9 notes

film speaks in a unique language of Sight & Sound ٠٠٠

So in love with the Tunisian film
The Silences of the Palace
٠٠٠  صمت القصور
Jan 23, 2014 / 8 notes

So in love with the Tunisian film
The Silences of the Palace
٠٠٠ صمت القصور

"I even see the cinema itself as a woman, with its alternation of light and darkness, of appearing and disappearing images" FELLINI ٠٠٠
Jan 7, 2014 / 7 notes

"I even see the cinema itself as a woman, with its alternation of light and darkness, of appearing and disappearing images" FELLINI ٠٠٠

check out my article for Don’t Panic mag || CINEMATIC DÉJÀ VU || http://dontpaniconline.com/magazine/film/cinematic-deja-vu-
Dec 15, 2013 / 1 note

check out my article for Don’t Panic mag || CINEMATIC DÉJÀ VU || http://dontpaniconline.com/magazine/film/cinematic-deja-vu-

"whatever you end up doing, love it" // CINEMA PARADISO 1988 
Dec 8, 2013 / 2 notes

"whatever you end up doing, love it" // CINEMA PARADISO 1988 

Battle of Algiers٠1966
Oct 13, 2013 / 2 notes

Battle of Algiers٠1966

I think the great artists have always thought with the heart.
Oct 13, 2013 / 1 note
Fist clenched, eyes ablaze, hair in the wind, her body moving defiantly to the sound of the drums and cries of the crowd around her, an Algerian women dances in the street, taunting the French troops and waving in her hands the flag of the nation that eight years of bloody civil conflict have brought into being.
Oct 13, 2013 / 2 notes

Fist clenched, eyes ablaze, hair in the wind, her body moving defiantly to the sound of the drums and cries of the crowd around her, an Algerian women dances in the street, taunting the French troops and waving in her hands the flag of the nation that eight years of bloody civil conflict have brought into being.

Aug 28, 2013 / 2 notes

Rih al Arwas ٠ The wind of the Aurés

Algerian masterpiece 1966

Jun 17, 2013 / 11 notes

'the parable of the pebble' ٠ La Strada

Jun 16, 2013 / 6 notes

LA STRADA ( The Road ) 1954 
by FEDERICO FELLINI

Giulietta Masina as Gelsomina
Anthony Quinn as Zampanó


~Partly conforming to the social themes attributed to Italian neorealism, La Strada follows the journey of Gelsomina, a young waif-like girl who is sold by her mother to an inhumane circus man -Zampanó.

What I most admire about this masterpiece is the way in which Fellini used it as a vehicle to transcend Italian cinema into a new era of poetic expression.

As the traditional neorealist films focused solely on a narrative driven by a poverty of financial means, the poetic mythology used in ‘La Strada’ reaches far beyond this, alluding to a much deeper moral and spiritual poverty.

I find this reflected in the film’s use of image, which Fellini skilfully uses to convey his complex characterisation of Gelsomina and Zampanó- who both suffer from individual alienation.

Although Fellini had been criticised at the time for his unconventional use of poetic symbolism, I believe La Strada to be successful in reaching a new level of discourse, which would later elevate Italian cinema into a revolution of artistic achievement.

‘There are more Zampano’s in the world than bicycle thieves, and the story of a character who discovers his neighbour is just as important as the treatment of a strike. What separates us is no doubt a materialist vision of the world’ -FELLINI.

Not only does La Strada serve as a metaphor for the search of meaning in life, yet I also believe it to be Fellini’s manner of commenting on what he perceived as a lack of communication and understanding in the world.

Through his well-crafted characterisation of the protagonists, along with his stylistically unique mise-en-scene, Fellini effectively demonstrates a particular sense of depth within his ‘cinema of poetry’.